Frequently Asked Questions

    General

  1. How do I work with BLISS?
  2. I don't live in the US or Canada, can BLISS help me?
  3. What is a Canadian Green Card?
  4. Am I qualified for immigration to Canada?
  5. How long does it take process an application?
  6. How much money do I need for immigration into Canada?
  7. What about my dependents that will not accompany me to Canada?
  8. My wife and children are not living with me now, can I apply for them?
  9. My family does not speak English or French, can they immigrate with me?
  10. How much money is involved Department fee? Are there other fees or costs?
  11. How I can pay your professional fees? Must I pay in Canadian Dollars?


  12. Skilled\Professional Worker Class

  13. Who qualifies as an independent immigrant?
  14. Does it help to have a relative in Canada?
  15. What fees must I pay?
  16. Who is included in my application?
  17. Do I need a passport or travel document?
  18. Must I or other members of my family attend an interview?
  19. Do professionals need registration and licensing to work in Canada?
  20. For how long is my Immigrant Visa valid?


  21. Business & Entrepreneurial Class

  22. What does Entrepreneur mean?
  23. I am not sure of the details of the business I am going to start. Do I need a business plan?
  24. Is there a minimum amount of money I need to bring as an Entrepreneur?
  25. I want to start a business in Vancouver, do I need pre-approval from the city or province?
  26. What if I don't get my business started after arriving in Canada?
  27. What if I change my mind about the kind of business I want to run?
  28. What if I can not meet the terms set by the Entrepreneurial Visa requirements?


  29. Investor Class

  30. I have significant funds, can I immigrate to Canada?
  31. How much money do I need to be an Investor?
  32. Do I need to liquidate all of my assets?
  33. If I am an Investor, do I have to work in Canada?
  34. Can I choose the Investment?
  35. Is the investment safe?
  36. I could be an investor, but don't want to lock away such a large amount of money for that long. Are there other programs?
  37. When must I provide the investment fund?
  38. Will you notify the Immigration department when my investment is made?
  39. I want to immigrate to Montreal, are the investor requirements the same?
  40. I inherited a large sum of money, can I use that in my application?
  41. How can I apply for early withdrawal of my investment?


  42. Self Employed Class

  43. How does Self-Employed differ from Entrepreneur?
  44. I am a nurse, can I apply for Self-Employed Immigration?
  45. I have never owned a business before, can I be a Self-Employed Immigrant?
  46. After I get to Canada, how do I prove I am Self-Employed?


  47. Family Class

  48. What does it mean to Sponsor an immigrant?
  49. Whom may I sponsor using the Family Class?
  50. How long must I wait before sponsoring my relative?
  51. I want to get married, how do I sponsor my fiancée?
  52. What is a Dependent and what is required for immigration?
  53. My daughter is planning to get married. Can I sponsor her?
  54. I am going to sponsor my parents, my wife and my children. Can I sponsor my wife's parents?
  55. I just immigrated to Canada and don't have a long employment record. Can I sponsor my relatives?


  56. Medical Examination

  57. Is there a medical requirement for immigrating to Canada?
  58. Can my own doctor do the medical examination?
  59. Will I receive a copy of the medical report and the result of the medical examination?
  60. For how long is the medical examination valid?
  61. Must everyone in my family have a medical examination?
  62. My children are studying abroad and cannot return home for their immigration medical examination for another six months. I do not want to delay my application. What should I do?
  63. I do not understand "excessive demand" or whether my ailment would place an excessive demand on Canada's health or social services. Can you tell me more?
  64. Can the DMP advise me regarding my application?


  65. Upon Arrival

  66. What happens when I arrive in Canada?
  67. What settlement services are available?
  68. Can you help me find a job?
  69. What are the wage slabs? Do you help the applicants to secure a job while they are in Canada ?. what are the chances I can get a job if I apply. Is there a way I can apply for job and process my migration application with job offer? How do I do this ?
  70. After obtaining permanent resident status in Canada, what if I need to return to my country to settle my affairs?


  71. Other

  72. How can I prove my English language skills to qualify for Canadian immigration?
  73. What are the Settlement Funds? How can I prove my Settlement Funds?
  74. What are the chances the application will be successful? If not successful, how much of the money paid will be re-imbursed?
  75. Upon approval of application by Canadian Immigration, can I enter and live in any province?. I understand Alberta offers lots of opportunities for experienced graduates /technical skill like mine. Are there any restrictions for immigrants to hold white collar jobs?
  76. How is my educational degree completed through distance education evaluated?


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General

1. How do I work with BLISS?

Although each case and service package may be different and processing time varies among visa offices and between applicants., we have provided a general outline of the steps within the application process and how BLISS will work with you throughout the process.

All along the process, BLISS will stand ready to assist you and answer your questions.

2. I don't live in the US or Canada, can BLISS help me?

Yes, generally we can assist you no matter where you live. Because of our focus on superior customer service, we have many overseas clients. Depending on where you, the principal applicant live and work, the application will be filed in one of the offices worldwide.

3. What is a Canadian Green Card?

The term green card is borrowed from the United States. The Permanent Resident status in Canada is similar. Started from June 28, 2002, "Maple Card" is issued to its Permanent Residents.

4. Am I qualified for immigration to Canada?

Every case is different. As a first step, please submit our free assessment form on-line or contact us directly. You may qualify as a skilled worker applicant, a foreign worker applicant, a business applicant, a family class applicant, or student visa for immigration

5. How long does it take to process an application?

This depends on the complexity or your case, the class of application and the office which will be processing your application. The time frame for the application process is dependent on how soon you complete your application and send it to our office with all the necessary documents.
The remainder of time to complete the processing of your application depends on the Canadian Visa office which handles your application and whether no additional documents or information is required and/or whether you will be called for an interview. Processing time varies among visa offices and between applicants.

For Permanent Resident applications, it would take minimum of  12-18 months depending on the visa post and category under which application is submitted. It is important for you to provide all of the information requested by BLISS. Missing information usually leads to additional delays in processing your case.

6. How much money do I need for immigration into Canada?

Of course the Canadian government wants the immigrant to be self-sufficient after entering the country. You will likely need a minimum of Canadian dollar $10,000 for yourself plus an additional $3,000 per dependent that can be transferred or taken into Canada when you land (enter) the country. Certain classes of immigration may require additional financial resources

7. What about my dependents that will not accompany me to Canada?

All of your dependents, whether they will accompany you to Canada or not, must be included in the application. They can choose not to enter later when the application is approved. 

8. My wife and children are not living with me, can I apply for them?

Yes, if you are qualified, the entire family will be qualified. They will receive the Immigration Visa at the same time as you do. Many of our clients found this is a perfect way to reunite with their family. You need to apply for all of your dependents, regardless of where they are presently living with you or not.

9. My family does not speak English or French, can they immigrate with me?

Your wife and children do not have to be English speakers. Of course in their everyday Canadian life, they will need to use it. Fluency in English or French for the principal applicant is highly recommended.

The Government places emphasis on the principal applicant's fluency in English and French, and a person fluent in both languages will receive the maximum number of language points. An individual with no fluency in either language will receive no points, which may place that application in jeopardy. The point system indicates that a maximum of 24 points can be obtained for English and French fluency. Varying points for a lack of fluency in either speaking, writing, or reading will decrease the total number of points

10. How much money is involved Department fee? Are there other fees or costs?

The government  fees are as following:

  • Processing Fee with skilled worker application @Can $550 per adult member ( for couple $1100)
  • Processing fee with application, for each dependent child below age of 22 years Can $150.
  • Processing fee under Business Applicant is Can $1050 for main applicant and $550 for spouse and $150 for each child.

When you are finally granted the Permanent Residence Visa,  adult members need to pay one time Can$490 as the Permanent Residence Fee, which allows the Permanent Resident life time facilities in Canada like Child Tax benefits, a monthly children allowance for upto $400 per month, depending on family income, free education for children upto grade 12, health care coverage / allowances, retirement benefits such as old age pension of approx $1050 for single retired adult and $1800 for retired couple.

Besides application/landing fee, you will have to furnish photographs, may need certified copies of some documents for the application, which may involve some cost. When you decide to proceed with the application, BLISS will give you a list of required fees. BLISS will also require a fee for the services provided. Based on the complexity of your case, our service fee may vary

11. How I can pay your professional fees? Must I pay in Canadian Dollars?

BLISS allows great flexibility in payment methods via Visa and Mastercard Creit cards, wire transfers or bank drafts. You can pay us through your bank directly by wire transfer to our bank account in Canada. All banks deal in Telegraphic Transfers or Wire Transfers. If not you can also send Bank draft in US dollars and send that to us in the name of our company: for wire transfer please note below our  company account number and details of the bank:

    Account Name : Bliss Immigration & Placement Services Ltd.
    Our US dollars Account No: 4003299
    Branch / Transit NO: 02810
    SWIFT Code: ROYCCAT2
    Name of the Bank:    Royal Bank of Canada
    Address of Bank: 7167-120th St. Delta BC V4E 2A9 CANADA

On cases that are filed in the US, US dollars may be used for payment. Applications overseas are usually paid in Canadian Dollars. BLISS will advise you of the details when you apply.

Want more information? Contact Us

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Skilled\Professional Worker

12. Who qualifies as an independent immigrant?

A person with specific occupational skills and experience may qualify as an independent immigrant. These skills must be readily transferable to the Canadian labor market.

13. Does it help to have a relative in Canada?

Yes. Having a close relative living in Canada increases your point score under the selection system. The relative must be a permanent resident or Canadian citizen aged 19 or over, and he/she must be a "close relative". You must provide documentation to prove the relationship.

14. What fees must I pay?

You must pay a Cost Recovery (CR) fee to pay for the processing of your application. The CR fee is non-refundable, even if your application is refused. The Right of Landing Fee (ROLF) is required of every adult aged 19 or over in your family but, unlike the CR fee, is refundable if an Immigrant Visa is not issued or used, or if you withdraw your application or if your application is refused. The ROLF can be paid at any time during the application process, but must be paid before an Immigrant Visa can be issued. The ROLF must be paid to the same office where you paid the CR fee. You will also have to pay other fees such as those related to obtaining a medical examination and a police certificate. (Note: CR and ROLF are not applicable to non-accompanying family members, or to family members who are already permanent residents of Canada).

15. Who is included in my application?

If you are married, your spouse should be included as a dependent. You must also include on your application all dependent children whether they are accompanying you to Canada or not.

16. Do I need a passport or travel document?

You and your dependents must have valid passports or travel documents. If any of the documents are to expire soon, you should renew them. Diplomatic, official, service or public affairs passports cannot be used to immigrate to Canada. You must have a valid regular or private passport when you arrive. The validity of your visa may be affected by the validity of your passport.

17. Must I or other members of my family attend an interview?
A visa officer will review your application and decide if an interview is necessary. If so, you will be informed of the time and place. Your spouse and dependent children aged 18 or over may be asked to accompany you to the interview. The visa officer may ask about your job, work experience, education, reasons for migrating, plans and preparations. The officer may also ask about your family, spouse and/or dependents, or about your health, financial situation, or past difficulties with the law. There may also be questions to determine your ability to settle successfully in Canada.

18. Do professionals need registration and licensing to work in Canada?

In Canada, approximately 20 percent of occupations are regulated to protect the health and safety of Canadians (e.g., nurses, engineers, teachers, electricians). People who want to work in regulated occupations need to obtain a license from a provincial regulatory body. Licensing requirements often include education from a recognized school, Canadian work experience and completion of a technical exam. Fees for exams can be costly and are the responsibility of the applicant. Final assessment by the provincial authority can only be made once you are in Canada with permanent resident status.

19. For how long is my Immigrant Visa valid?

The validity date is based upon the earlier of: your or your dependents' passport validity date(s); or the medical validity date(s). Medical examination results are valid for 12 months after the initial medical examination. Immigrant visas cannot be extended once issued. If applicants do not use the visas within their validity, they must reapply for immigration to Canada.

Want to apply? Fill out the FREE ASSESSMENT

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Business & Entrepreneurial Class

20. What does Entrepreneur mean?

The Entrepreneur Business Immigrant is presumed to start a business in Canada. People who are qualified have management experience and may also have experience starting and/or owning a business outside of Canada. You will be required to hire at least one non-family member in your business. The entrepreneur requires sufficient funds to start or buy the business.

21. I am not sure of the details of the business I am going to start. Do I need a business plan?

The approval for immigration is by your qualifications. Of course it is good if you have such a business plan, as it shows the funding that you will need. However, the decision to let you immigrate is not based on having such a plan.

22. Is there a minimum amount of money I need to bring as an Entrepreneur?

The purpose of the Entrepreneurial visa is to foster economic growth in Canada. Each case will be judged on the amount needed to start the kind of business you are planning. BLISS will assist you in providing the documentation which shows that you are likely to succeed after immigration. Resources of CAD $200,000 can be used as a guideline.

23. I want to start a business in Vancouver, do I need pre-approval from the city or province?

No, with the exception of Quebec, the provinces and local governments are not involved in your immigration project. It may be useful to you to contact their business support offices as a resource for your planning.

24. What if I don't get my business started after arriving in Canada?

During the first two years in Canada, the Entrepreneur Immigrant must report to immigration offices regarding requirements placed on your visa. If you do not follow these requirements, you (and your family) may lose your immigrant status.

25. What if I change my mind about the kind of business I want to run?

You may change your plans, based on the conditions that you experience. However, you will need to keep Canadian immigration officials informed of such changes.

26. What if I can not meet the terms set by the Entrepreneurial Visa requirements?

The Canadian government realizes that sometimes business conditions can change quickly. When you feel that there will be difficulty in meeting the requirements, you should immediately contact the government to discuss the matter. Their stated policy is to be flexible if you are making a real effort to succeed. Remember that BLISS will always stand by to assist you after you have immigrated.

Want more information? Contact Us

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Investor Class

27. I have significant funds, can I immigrate to Canada?

One class of Business Immigrants is the Investor. They "loan" the Canadian a sizable amount of money, $CAD 400,000 for five years, without interest. This money is used for economic development. If you have operated, controlled or owned a business, you may qualify. There are restrictions as to your net worth and how you received that worth.

28. How much money do I need to be an Investor?

You need to be able to demonstrate that you have at least CAD $800,000 net worth that was accumulated through your own efforts. You may need to provide evidence in that regard.

29. Do I need to liquidate all of my assets?

No, generally you do not have to liquidate your assets. We will assist you in documenting what your assets are and guide you in your plans to immigrate.

30. If I am an Investor, do I have to work in Canada?

If you qualify as an Investor, you do not have to work nor begin a business. However you are free to do either, depending on your desires and abilities and the Canadian government welcomes you to contribute your talents to business development in the country.

31. Can I choose the Investment?

No, the government agencies will use the money as they determine.

32. Is the investment safe?

The deposits are guaranteed by the Canadian Provinces or Territories.

33. I could be an investor, but don't want to lock away such a large amount of money for that long. Are there other programs?

It is possible to get a loan for the investment from an approved financial company. The details are too complex for this web page. Some initial payment is required and there are some limits on the amount borrowed.

34. When must I provide the investment fund?

The funds must be paid before you can get your Immigration Visa. However, it may be paid any time up until that time. Depending on the details of your application, we suggest that you contact BLISS for details regarding your situation.

35. Will you notify the Immigration department when my investment is made?

No, this notification is done within the Canadian government, you nor BLISS has to do anything else.

36. I want to immigrate to Montreal, are the investor requirements the same?

The province of Quebec has it's own investment program, so additional forms will be submitted in your behalf. There are some differences in the program that we can explain to you. One major condition is that you must be selected by Quebec as well as approved by the Canadian government.

37. I inherited a large sum of money, can I use that in my application?

The rules for determining your net worth. Inheritance is generally not considered as being earned by you. Proceeds from investing from inheritance are considered earnings.

38. How can I apply for early withdrawal of my investment?

After you have your visa, your investment is locked for five years plus three months and is not available for withdrawal. If you choose not to accept your immigration visa, the money will be refunded after some processing time.

Want more information? Contact Us

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Self Employed Class

39. How does Self-Employed differ from Entrepreneur?

Self employed immigrants will support themselves with their skills, not necessarily hiring staff. Canada is looking to build both it's business base and its cultural and artistic base. BLISS maintains lists of professions that may be qualified as Self-Employed. The Self-Employed Immigrant does not have to bring extra money to Canada, as opposed to requirement for Entrepreneurial Immigrants.

40.  I am a nurse, can I apply for Self-Employed Immigration?

Some professions in Canada, such as a nurse, do not have a large need. They are unlikely to be accepted as a business immigrant. However, you may qualify under Skilled Worker Immigration category, based on your experience.

Fill out the free online assessment to check eligibility

41. I have never owned a business before, can I be a Self-Employed Immigrant?

If it is appropriate, we will work with you to prove to the officials that you are prepared to support yourself and your family though your own efforts. If you do not have experience and qualifications, we may suggest other immigration categories.

42. After I get to Canada, how do I prove I am Self-Employed?

Unlike the Entrepreneurial category, there are no terms set up in your visa. It is important to be able to describe what you intend to do when you get to Canada and how it will provide for you and your family. Although not required, it may be helpful for you to make a business plan.

Want more information? Contact Us

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Family Class

43. What does it mean to Sponsor an immigrant?

As a sponsor, you must agree to take care of your relatives' essential needs for 3-10 years and assure they do not receive public welfare. You also have to demonstrate you have the financial ability to do this and to be a Permanent Resident or Canadian citizen.

44. Whom may I sponsor using the Family Class?

If you are a Canadian Permanent Resident or citizen, the following people are eligible for family class sponsorship for immigration:

  • Spouse (16 years old or older).
  • Conjugal / Common-law Partner (16 years old or older).
  • Parents/Grandparents.
  • Dependent children, including adopted children.
  • Children under the age of 18 whom the sponsor intends to adopt.
  • Brothers, sisters, nephews, nieces, or grandchildren who are orphans, under the age of 18 and unmarried or not in a common-law relationship.
  • Any other relative if the sponsor has none of the above family members either in Canada or abroad.

45. How long must I wait before sponsoring my relative?

As soon as you have Permanent Resident status, you may apply to have your relative join you under the Family Class immigration class.

46. I want to get married, how do I sponsor my fiancé?

You need to get married first. After your marriage, you can file an application for Family Class immigration.

47. What is a Dependent and what is required for immigration?

Dependents must meet the same visa requirements as the principal applicant, including medical and background checks. Applicants must include all of their dependents on their application, whether or not the dependents plan to immigrate to Canada.

There are two classes of children that are dependents to their parents:

  • Under age 22 and unmarried.
  • Full-time students, married or single, studying at a college, university, or other educational institution. They must have been studying full time, supported by you.

48. My daughter is planning to get married. Can I sponsor her?

If your child is not a full time student, but under 22, she should delay his/her marriage until after becoming a Permanent Resident.

49. I am going to sponsor my parents, my wife and my children. Can I sponsor my wife's parents?

No, they will have to wait until your wife is a Permanent Resident. If she does not have independent financial ability, you will have to co-sponsor them with your wife.

50. I just immigrated to Canada and don't have a long employment record. Can I sponsor my relatives?

Yes, but you must be able to demonstrate that you have sufficient financial resources to support them through recent financial and employment records.

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Medical Examination

51.Is there a medical requirement for immigrating to Canada?

Yes. You and your dependents, whether accompanying you or not, must undergo and pass a medical examination. To pass the medical examination you or your dependents must not have a condition that is a danger to public health or safety or would cause excessive demand on health or social services in Canada.

52. Can my own doctor do the medical examination?

No. A physician on Canada's list of Designated Medical Practitioners (DMPs) must do the examination.

53. Will I receive a copy of the medical report and the result of the medical examination?

All medical reports and X-rays for the Immigration Medical Examination become the property of the Canadian Immigration Medical Authorities and cannot be returned to the applicant. The DMP will not advise you of the results of the medical. However, he/she will advise you if you have a health-related problem. The visa officer and not the DMP makes the final decision on whether or not a medical examination has been passed for immigration purposes. The visa office will inform you in writing should there be a problem with your medical examination .

54. For how long is the medical examination valid?

The medical examination is valid for 12 months from the date of the first medical examination. If your visa is not processed in this time, you must undergo another complete medical examination.

55. Must everyone in my family have a medical examination?

Yes. All of your dependents who are not already permanent residents or Canadian citizens, whether they will accompany you to Canada or not, must undergo a medical examination.

56. My children are studying abroad and cannot return home for their immigration medical examination for another six months. I do not want to delay my application. What should I do?

Whenever possible, the same DMP should perform the medical examination of all family members. If this is not possible, advise the visa office that your dependents are abroad and the visa office will arrange to have their medical examinations done by a DMP closer to their place of study. The visa office will forward a copy of the Medical Report: Section A, Client Identification & Summary (IMM 1017) to them, with the address of their nearest DMP. The visa office will fill in the tombstone data and affix a photograph of your dependent to the form.

The Visa Office & Number section of this form (IMM 1017) must have the name of the visa office where your application is being processed. The DMP doing the medical examination of your dependents must also forward their complete medical reports to the same Canadian medical office that received your report. Your dependents' medical examination reports will be matched with your file, as the Medical Report form will carry your file number.

57. I do not understand "excessive demand" or whether my ailment would place an excessive demand on Canada's health or social services. Can you tell me more?

This term refers to the significant burden placed on Canada's health or social services due to ongoing hospitalization or medical, social or institutional care for physical or mental illnesses, or special education or training. Individuals may be denied admittance to Canada due to the high costs of their care. The factors considered during the medical assessment include whether or not hospitalization or medical, social or institutional care are required and whether potential employability or productivity could be affected. For example, a person with a serious disease or psychiatric disorder requiring ongoing care or hospitalization may be inadmissible because their requirements would place "excessive demand" on the Canadian health-care system. Individuals with developmental delay or congenital disorders who require special education or training to lead an independent life may also be inadmissible. Other conditions which could place a significant financial burden on Canada's health or social services would also render an applicant medically inadmissible.

58. Can the DMP advise me regarding my application?

No. The DMP is only responsible for conducting a medical examination in accordance with Canada's immigration requirements. The DMP cannot provide any advice on the immigration process.

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Upon Arrival

59. What happens when I arrive in Canada?

When you arrive, you must present your Immigrant Visa to a Canadian customs or immigration officer at your first port of entry. The officer will check your visa and travel document and ask you questions similar to those on the Immigrant Application Form (IMM 0008) to verify that you are of good character and in good health. You may also be required to show proof of your funds. If there are no difficulties, the officer will authorize your admission to Canada as a permanent resident.

60. What settlement services are available?

Canada's settlement services are limited. You can learn about them from Canada Immigration Centres, Human Resources Canada Centres and private organizations.

61. Can you help me find a job?

We can provide you leads and guidance in job search in canada before  and after your arrival. However we do not guarantee providing jobs. We will also guide you to free job finding clubs to join in search of job. Human Resources Canada Centres are available to assist all Canadian citizens and permanent residents in finding employment.

62. What are the wage slabs? Do you help the applicants to secure a job while they are in Canada ?. what are the chances I can get a job if I apply. Is there a way I can apply for job and process my migration application with job offer? How do I do this ?

Wages in Canada range from minimum of $8 per hour to $35 per hour  or more depending on the managerial type / skill / technicality of each job.  Our role would be to give you job leads and help you advise in that direction. we shall start our advise on this free service of providing you on line job leads, after our company starts to process your case.

63. After obtaining permanent resident status in Canada, what if I need to return to my country to settle my affairs?

Permanent residents may leave and re-enter Canada as often as they wish as long as they spend less than six months in any 12-month period outside Canada. If permanent residents are out of Canada for more than six months in any 12-month period, they will require a Returning Resident Permit to re-enter Canada. While such permits can be applied for either in Canada or overseas, they can only be applied for after you have become a permanent resident.

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Others

64. How can I prove my English language skills to qualify for Canadian immigration?

You can either prove that you have some written documentation about your high english language skills by way of education or work history ( to be  accepted at discretion of immigration officer)  or by writing one of  the approved english tests and securing required test band ( which can not be challenged or questioned by the immigration officer), which we shall give you details after you retain us. You are given 6 month time after your application is filed to write the test and produce result.

Vancouver English Centre provides excellent and affordable english training and gets you prepared with an excellent base for the language proficiency test.

65. What are the Settlement Funds? How can I prove my Settlement Funds?

Settlement funds are the funds available with you when you come to Canada. This fund is like buffer fund to prove that you can to live for 6 months with your family without any help from any government agency, in case you do not get job immediately, upon arrival. You shall need to show liquid funds and not property value assessment in form of cash, bank deposits, shares, stocks, fixed investments or provident funds or life insurance policies.

66. What are the chances the application will be successful? If not successful, how much of the money paid will be re-imbursed?

Our company accepts the clients and cases, whose chances of success are very high. However, the onus in providing required information and documents including proof of High English proficiency ( if required), lies on the applicant. If the client notifies our company of cancellation of his / her case, or refund of money within 24 hours of retaining our services, we will refund the whole amount, minus banking charge. If the case is refused due to the proven negligence of our company or inordinate delay on our part, we shall refund the full amount to the client, without questions asked.

67. Upon approval of application by Canadian Immigration, can I enter and live in any province?. I understand Alberta offers lots of opportunities for experienced graduates /technical skill like mine. Are there any restrictions for immigrants to hold white collar jobs?

Yes you can live and work in any province of Canada once you become landed person / permanent  resident status.

68. How is my educational degree completed through distance education evaluated?

The key to evaluating correspondence courses lies in the term "equivalent to". You will need to show that the degree or certificate earned is "equivalent to" a degree or certificate earned by a student who took the same program on site. So a correspondence program which takes 2 years to complete, but would take someone on site 1 academic year is "equivalent to" one year of full time studies. Conversely, if someone completes a program in 3 months which is "equivalent to" one full year of on site study still counts as one year. It can be helpful to have a letter from the degree granting institution explaining the full-time study requirements, or you can have the University.

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